It’s My Life, and it’s Now or Never!

The title, of course, comes from a Bon Jovi song. Bon Jovi was big in my growing-up years. And I was thinking that it was a good time to talk more about myself and who I am–and how I came to be. Please don’t make me regret it!

So where did I come from?

I was born on May 22, 1975 in Fayetteville, Arkansas. I would end up spending a lot of time as a kid in Arkansas, which led to a strong desire to get the hell out of there as an adult.

I was a pretty normal kid–loved cartoons, especially Transformers, GI Joe, and their 80’s ilk. I also loved movies. My dad used to take me to films quite a bit as a kid, almost anything I wanted, and we even went to several films for repeat viewings. I can’t tell you how many times we saw Ghostbusters, The Last Starfighter, and the Neverending Story.

I grew up between Wyoming and Arkansas. My junior and high school experience was the deep south, with all of that entails. Fortunately, my school (Lakeside) was one of the best in the state. All the doctors’ and lawyers’ kids went there, so we had a terrible football team and lots of money for cool school programs in art, literature, and science.

I got my first job mowing lawns in Hot Springs, Arkansas during my junior high school days. It was hot, dirty work, but I got enough money to keep me in comic books and gaming books.

Gaming

I’ve also been a life-long gamer. My dad started me out at age 11 when I was living in Evanston, Wyoming. My father brought home this red box labeled ‘Dungeons and Dragons.’ He told me that ‘it looked interesting,’ and that I should ‘really learn how to play it.’ So I did.

I played D&D religiously for years. Once I got to junior high and high school, I branched out a bit. My friends (some of which I am still in touch with!) helped me get interested in games like Rifts, Star Wars (West End D6), TMNT, Robotech, and Marvel Super Heroes, amongst others. I first got interested in Champions (4th edition, the big blue book) during this time.

Wargames were also something I’ve loved for a long time. I got started (again, in high school) with Starfleet Battles, Wooden Ships and Iron Men, and some others that one of my friends had (he owned a nice large collection of Avalon Hill games).

I didn’t get into serious wargaming until my army days. I was in my first enlistment and deployed to Fort Knox, Kentucky, when I met some guys playing Warhammer 40,000. This game hooked me in right away, and I never looked back.

Since then, I’ve been an avid player of miniature games like Battlefleet Gothic, Necromunda, Mordheim, and many others. It’s this love of miniature games that led me to design some of my own.

Fort Knox led to a lot of gaming milestones for me. When I got out of the army, I moved to Louisville and met up with the gaming groups there. These groups included some good friends of mine, like Dave Mattingly, Eric Rademaker, and many others.

We played a ton of games, like Feng Shui, Jovian Chronicles, Tri-stat, and more. Through this group, I got hooked up with my first “real job” in the gaming industry–a company called Citizen Games had formed in 2000 and was looking for a line editor who could work with D20. I got the job.

Professional! Mostly!

Citizen Games gave me the chance to work on some cool books with cool people. I dove right in, and not long after that I was freelancing for Atlas Games. The Penumbra Fantasy Bestiary was my first foray into making monsters — and hardly the last. I must have done pretty well, since one of my monsters (the Dreadwraith) was turned into a miniature from Lance & Laser.

I got hired by Games Workshop in 2003 and worked there until 2005. I was a copy writer and copy editor, and I got onto the White Dwarf team writing articles (mostly tactics stuff) and battle reports. I also wrote a bunch of scenarios for Warhammer Fantasy and The Lord of the Rings battle game. This is where my interest in Warhammer 40,000 got sharpened to a razor edge. I also became an expert on Warhammer Fantasy around the same time!

I got hired by Fantasy Flight Games next to work on Dark Heresy. This was fortuitous since I had been in touch with them just a few weeks earlier about doing some 4th edition D&D work with them. They were hiring a guy to do Dark Heresy, and with my background, I was a perfect fit. It was basically like being headhunted.

Working at FFG was great. I was thrown into the deep end and I learned all kinds of valuable skills. I went from being just a writer to doing everything related with project development. Managing freelancers, art direction, budgets, production, schedules, and most of all layout! I grew a huge amount in my skillset at FFG and produced some great games for Warhammer 40,000 Roleplay.

After FFG, I got headhunted again — this time for video games. There was a studio in Austin, Texas called Vigil Games working on an MMO: Dark Millennium Online. It was 40K-based, and my background again came into play. I got hired and moved to Texas.

This was a bad time to get into the video game industry, though: 2011 was rough, and DMO got cancelled soon after I arrived. I did get to create some quests, build some characters, create regions, build quest chains and POIs and Hero props. I even did some level design work with the editor. But, the game seemed doomed, and everything ended early in 2012.

Instead, I found myself working on Darksiders II.

Darksiders II was interesting to work on. On the one hand, the studio was a mess: I was literally told in one meeting by one of the higher-ups on the game, “I don’t know what I want, but I don’t want _that_” (pointing to our work on the screen). I worked on the main script for the game and wrote the story and dialogue for all three DLC’s, but they refused to give me a “writer” credit. Instead, I’m credited as a “designer.” Let me put it this way: if you read the description on any item in the game, look at the info on how a skill works, or see Death talking during any part of the DLC’s, I wrote it. I polished quite a few bits of the main script too (not that it was bad, the main script was pretty good).

On the other hand, I had almost complete autonomy. The writing team got pared down to two early on: me and Molly Fincher, an intern. Molly was awesome, she learned the ropes right away and we rocked it out as the writing team. We spoke all the dialogue aloud to each other and checked in with the sound guy to make sure our stuff sounded good. We created quests and characters and made Death sound awesome.

At the end of the day I’m super proud of Darksiders II and I enjoyed writing for it. I’d do it again in a heartbeat (Nordic Games, let me know what’s up!).

From there, it was back to freelancing, writing for other companies, and starting up my blog… which led to this website you’re reading this on right now.

 

 

 

 

Comments are closed.