Dark Heresy, A look back, Part 2

Part 1 you can find under the title “I am the Lord Inquisitor.”

Some additional thoughts on my tenure of Dark Heresy…

Artwork-wise, I got to work with some of the best in the business. Of particular note are Simon Eckert, whose black and whites in Ascension are pure magic, and Matt Bradbury — this guy was a superstar. He went from quarter-pages to doing covers for the books in no time (most of his covers are for Rogue Trader and, more notably, Black Crusade).

Another note about artwork: The plan was to originally have the same artist from the core book do the covers for the entire line. That didn’t work out due to the artist’s availability, so we ended up going with a different fellow for Ascension, and then Daarken for two more books, then Matt Bradbury, etc. I think in general, the line still looks very consistent, art-wise.

For Blood of Martyrs, something I really wanted was to give the Adepta Sororitas their due. The Inquisitor’s Handbook had some rules for Sororitas, but I didn’t feel like it really rang true. So we went all-out in this book to say, hey, Battle Sisters!

The Apostasy Gambit is entirely something created by the head of FFG. Christian Petersen was in charge of FFG at that time, and he had a habit of putting things on the schedule with just a title. This was something that Would Happen ™, but Christian was a super-busy guy. There was basically no chance of getting his input meaningfully on a project like this. So, it was our job to take the basic concept and… find a way to make it work. This isn’t always bad, but I don’t think the Apostasy Gambit is, or was, the best implemented adventure series for the line. Again, given my druthers, I would have done a single book (like we did with Lure of the Expanse for Rogue Trader) with one adventure (in multiple parts) rather than three separate books.

The adventure in the Book of Judgment was provided to us very early on (I think in my first month or two at FFG). That means we had to wait almost four years to find a good place to put this adventure, but I’m glad we did. It’s a fine adventure and the Book of Judgment is better for it.

The Lathe Worlds was SO FUN to work on. All kinds of neat stuff I had been saving for this book finally saw print. The Lords Dragon, motherfuckers! Hell yes.

One thing I really liked is seeing the links grow between the RPG and the miniature game. In one instance, the tabletop rulebook (5th edition, I believe?) had a notation for the Calixis Sector on the galaxy map. In another, the Ordo Chronos was first developed in Dark Heresy (Ascension, I believe) and has gone on to be mentioned in official Inquisition rulebooks for the tabletop game (thanks to Andy Hoare!).

Things just seemed to come together beautifully for Creatures Anathema. That book had some fantastic writing in it and went on to win some awards. I was a bit experimental on that one (since it was my first from start to finish as Lead Developer). I tried out putting a “thought for the day” on every page. Then, I quickly ran out of enough “thoughts for the day!”

The final book in the line, the Lathe Worlds, was actually one of the first books I mentioned during my initial interview for the job with FFG. Edge of Darkness came about as a project for an RPG intern… we needed to give him something worthwhile to do, so Edge became that thing. And now, Edge is recognized as one of the best intro adventures for the line.

Adventure contests were something fun that we did. I wish we had done more of them, actually. We found some great writers (such as the very talented Andrea Gausman) through these vectors.

The original Dark Heresy stuff (meaning, the line from Black Industries) was a bit of a mess. The Inquisitor’s Handbook was basically three separate books of content that was welded together at the last minute. It’s still a good book, but you can tell when you look at it that it was never meant to be a cohesive whole. In addition, I have some original files of Dark Heresy from the Black Industries days, and, well… it’s best left buried. Some of the writing is best described as “bad Shadowrun fanfiction set in 40K,” and some of the design concepts are bizarre (such as using WFRP’s multitudinal career system — “Speeder Jock” and “Astronaut” being two careers in that version.). Sometimes it is rough to see how the sausage is made. And I want to be clear, this is no slam against the final product of Dark Heresy and the Inquisitor’s Handbook — both are very special, very good products!

There is a ton of fan-made material for Dark Heresy. Some of it is good. In fact, we found one of our standout authors (Nathan Dowdell) through his fan-work (the Great Devourer, I believe).

I made a lot of references to fan-material and fan-favorite stuff in Dark Heresy. I snuck in references to 4chan’s /tg/ traditional games channel, Love Can Bloom, Adept Grendel, and more. I added in quotes from Commissar Holt, the hero of the awesome classic video game Final Liberation, and as many references to Dawn of War as I could get away with.

Personally, I love Easter Eggs. I put a bunch of them into Rogue Trader and Deathwatch, too.

Here’s a tidbit: Only War started out as a sourcebook for Guardsmen for Dark Heresy. Once we took more than a cursory look at the idea, though, it quickly became clear this was an entire line of its own, and we ended up making that so. It was the right choice.

One last thing I’ll leave you with: I named as many Tech-Priests as I could after fonts.

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